John Birdsall discusses his biography of James Beard, "The Man Who Ate Too Much"

A Q&A with John Birdsall about his biography of James Beard, "The Man Who Ate Too Much"
Bill Addison • Los Angeles Times • October 17, 2020
To many chefs, restaurateurs, writers and lovers of food, James Beard is solely a bald, smiling icon on awards bestowed by the foundation that bears his name. His once-outsize influence on food in America had begun to contract well before his...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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