Netflix's 'High on the Hog' is essential food TV

A riveting new series examines how African American chefs shaped the nation's tastes.
Bill Addison • Los Angeles Times • May 26, 2021
The macaroni pie is ready, so steamy and golden you want to reach through the television screen to scoop up a big helping. Historian Leni Sorensen hovers over a kitchen hearth at Monticello, the Virginia plantation built by Thomas Jefferson. She...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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