David Chang on restaurants and his own life: 'The old ways just don’t work anymore'

David Chang discusses his memoir, "Eat a Peach," and the restaurant industry's pandemic crisis.
Bill Addison • Los Angeles Times • September 19, 2020
When journalists analyze David Chang’s influence on American dining, we tend to focus on how his first two New York restaurants — Momofuku Noodle Bar, opened in 2004, and Ssäm Bar, which followed in 2006 — crumpled divides between formal and...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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