The best new cookbooks of fall 2020

Our favorite cookbooks of the season, just in time for holiday shopping
Bill Addison • Los Angeles Times • December 3, 2020
Cookbooks are always about connection — written to share the love of a cuisine or celebrate ancestry, or sometimes to eulogize broken bonds and safeguard history. If you’ve run out of ideas or motivation for preparing your next meal, if you’re...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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