Palestinian cookbooks help preserve a culture's identity

Sami Tamimi's new book Falastin is the latest in a spate of Palestinian cookbooks
Bill Addison • Los Angeles Times • July 2, 2020
The deep red of ground sumac brings to mind the ripest strawberry, though the spice’s flavor veers lemony and tart — like a floral vinegar distilled into powder. Its brightness defines sumaqqiyeh, a Palestinian stew with origins in Gaza City,...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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