Review: Korean American deli Yangban Society is going to be big

Critic Bill Addison reviews Yangban Society, a genre-defying Korean American deli from chefs Katianna and John Hong
Bill Addison • Los Angeles Times • March 17, 2022
Twin deli cases stand center stage, gleaming and summoning. You’ll see them as soon as you tug open the heavy glass door to Yangban Society. Your attention may bolt in many directions — the upstairs kitchen overlooking the 5,000-square-foot space...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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