Panda Express' Next Venture: Dry Cleaning

Edwin Goei • OC Weekly • January 5, 2012
Not content in making the addictive substance called Orange Chicken available at every airport and mall food court (and yes, even friggin' China), the creators of Panda Express have now branched out into…dry cleaning? ] We'll let you make up your...
The full article can be read on the OC Weekly website.

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