Exclusive first look at the new Mélisse and Citrin in Santa Monica

Josiah Citrin gives an exclusive first look at the Citrin and Melisse, both opening Dec. 17.
Jenn Harris • Los Angeles Times • December 9, 2019
The fryer in the kitchen at Mélisse crackled and sputtered to life on a recent afternoon as chefs Ken Takayama and Josiah Citrin fished out two golden-brown spheres the size of ping-pong balls. The smell of fried chicken and sharp cheese filled...
The full article can be read on the Los Angeles Times website.

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